Video

Short video of the Piesporter Goldtröpfchen with Andreas Adam.

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Andreas Adam in the steep Piesporter Goldtröpfchen, looking southeast across the Mosel River. This vineyard is rather large, forming an almost 90 degree curved amphitheater of 130 hectares with exposures of SW to S to SE. The SE side here gets early sun and early shade. Across the river are expansive flat vineyards of lesser quality planted to mostly müller thurgau and riesling and labelled as Piesporter and Piesporter Michelsberg.

Andreas Adam in the steep Piesporter Goldtröpfchen, looking southeast across the Mosel River. This vineyard is rather large, forming an almost 90 degree curved amphitheater of 130 hectares with exposures of SW to S to SE. The SE side here gets early sun and early shade. Across the river are expansive flat vineyards of lesser quality planted to mostly müller thurgau and riesling and labelled as Piesporter and Piesporter Michelsberg.

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2011 Dhron Mosel Vintage Report, courtesy of Andreas Adam

paraphrasing here:

The winter of 2010/2011 was the hardest and coldest in recent memory (no doubt similar to that experienced in NY and New England!) and many new plantings were lost. Summer completely bypassed spring, resulting in early shoots and a 4 week early flowering. Holy Schist! A cloudy (and rainy) June/July/August offered relief from the stressful spring, though as Andreas points out, summer was “good for the vines, not for the people.” A colossal hail storm on the 26th of August devestated the Mosel and narrowly passed the Dhron Valley- air moves quickly from the Hunsrück Mts along the Dhron and pushed the storm away. Fruit, ripening over 2 weeks early, was heavily damaged in other parts of the region. Indian summer arrived afterwards, with a dry September and even drier October, allowing for a still early harvest with relatively high Oechsle (though not like 2010) and moderate acidity.

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A quick tour through the great RED SLOPE (or ROTER HANG) of the Rheinhessen, located in Nierstein.  Here are the great slopes of both the Oelberg and Hipping vineyards, which rest on the center and steepest parts of the Red Slope.

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We made it to Germany!

The plane landed safely and we were immediately into a taxi and on our way.  It’s about 7:45am, German time, once our taxi departs the airport in Frankfurt.  I’m basically working on NO sleep at this point, but anxious to start tasting some 2011s, and there’s really no time to squander.  

After a quick shower/change and a traditional German breakfast of seed bread, speck, boiled eggs, meusli, Multi-V juice, speck, more bread, more speck, and coffee we dart off to taste what proved to be a surprising lineup at Geil.

The lineup at Geil was teeming with incredibly satisfying wines, which is an important distinction here.  It’s not enough to be happy with anything in life at times, better yet to be satisfied.  This is exactly what these wines provide.  And in a tasting of 15 different wines, only a few left me with uninterested notes, the rest with a grave pleasure.  

This vintage seemed especially suited for emphasizing the minerality and fruit contrasts in Geil’s wines, as well as pronouncing the various tea and silvery green-herbaceous tones that are more often only found in the better terroirs of the Rheinhessen.   

A stand out for me was the 2011 Riesling Geyersberg.  Blind I might peg this as a quality Cru riesling from Austria’s Kremstal.  The balance was everything one could hope for - stretching from aromas of spring pea, sweet blue grass and mint; to meyer lemon, smoke and volcanic rock scents.  This wine was both round/juicy in the mouth and full of firm rocky minerality.  But what’s most impressive is the overall architecture here - firm, strong, integrated, unwavering, yet as delicate and elegant as it could be.